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Glamour on Board: Fashion from Titanic the Movie

 Fashion from Titanic the Movie

February 9 – May 13, 2018

The stylish fashions and luxurious travels of the Vanderbilts launch at Biltmore with a stunning new exhibition, Glamour on Board: Fashion from Titanic the Movie. Dazzling costumes from the iconic film—representing the extensive wardrobes required by transatlantic travelers like George and Edith Vanderbilt in the early 1900s—will be displayed in the grand rooms of Biltmore House. This is the first large-scale exhibition of fashions from Titanic, which won a record 11 Oscars including Best Picture and Best Costume Design.

More than 45 film costumes evoke the lifestyle of the era, when voyages on the great ocean liners of the early 20th century offered high society and luxury on ships known as “Floating Palaces.” First class passengers took every opportunity to see and be seen in the finest fashions of the time, from strolling the promenade deck to attending elegant formal dinners. And, just like in Titanic, the days at sea fostered friendships and romances, including Vanderbilt’s courtship of Edith Stuyvesant Dresser.

Learn more about the Vanderbilts’ extensive travels while marveling at the exquisite detail meticulously recreated for these award-winning fashions.

The original portion of the Dry Ridge Inn was built in 1849
as a parsonage for, what was at that time, the Salem Campground, a religious revival camping area that had been incorporated in 1832.

The surrounding area, which is now know as Weaverville, had been named Dry Ridge by the Cherokee Indians long before the campground was established. During the Civil War the parsonage was utilized as a camp hospital for Confederate soldiers suffering from pneumonia.

The high altitude and pleasant weather of the surrounding grounds made it an ideal area for soldiers recovering from the then-fatal illness.  In 1888, a man named C.C. Brown bought the parsonage, remodeled it, and turned it into a home for his wife and eight children. Reportedly, Brown wanted the tallest house in Weaverville, so the building’s hip roof gives way to additional gables and added height to its peak. Members of the Brown family occupied the home until 1958, during which time one of the eight children, Fred, became the mayor of Weaverville.

As the town of Weaverville grew,
it became a practice for many of the large homes in the area
to take in overnight and weekly guests who were visiting the area,
which had become renowned for the natural beauty
of the nearby Blue Ridge Mountains.
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